Teagasc Publishes Prospectus Of Courses For 2019

Knowledge, skills and capability requirements will be more challenging over the coming decades, according to Teagasc, the primary provider of accredited further (vocational) education for the land–based sector.

Teagasc says practical knowledge will always be essential, but there will be an increasing need to broaden and deepen skillsets, regarding sustainability, new and smart technologies, business management, risk management, safety, and food assurance.

The overriding need in the 21st century will be to develop learners’ personal capabilities, such as learning to learn, problem-solving, and self-initiative.

And formal education can no longer sustain evolving skillset needs over the course of a career; continuous learning after formal education will be imperative.

The new vision for future education needs comes as Teagasc publishes its Prospectus of Courses for 2019.

Pictured at a Teagasc Grass10 open day on the farm of Niall Moloney, 2018 Young Grassland Farmer of the Year in Crecora, Co Limerick are lecturer Lorraine Delahunty with Clonakilty Agricultural College students Brian McCarthy, Kenmare, John O'Sullivan, Kenmare, Adam Smith, Clonakilty, Andrew Landan, Watergrasshill, Alan Pyburn, Durrus & Michael Collins, Schull. Picture: O'Gorman Photography

Pictured at a Teagasc Grass10 open day on the farm of Niall Moloney, 2018 Young Grassland Farmer of the Year in Crecora, Co Limerick are lecturer Lorraine Delahunty with Clonakilty Agricultural College students Brian McCarthy, Kenmare, John O’Sullivan, Kenmare, Adam Smith, Clonakilty, Andrew Landan, Watergrasshill, Alan Pyburn, Durrus & Michael Collins, Schull. Picture: O’Gorman Photography

Why is it important to become a ‘young trained farmer’?

Training with Teagasc will allow you to:

  Develop the capability to adopt and integrate future advances in farm husbandry and technologies.

  Be proficient in business planning, financial management, governance and compliance.

  Develop an entrepreneurial mindset and foster fresh thinking and new approaches to work.

  Prepare for smart farming, precision farming, sensor technology, automation and robotics.

  Become digitally literate to exploit future technology to the maximum.

  Master future environmental and climate change challenges.

Furthermore, recent national policy has prioritised ‘young trained farmers’ for various farm schemes and incentives.

Graduates of Teagasc training courses meet the training qualification to become a ‘young trained farmer’.

Measures and schemes where a young trained farmer qualification is required, or is advantageous to have, include the Young Farmers Scheme, National Reserve Scheme (Young Farmer Category), Young Farmer Capital Investment Scheme under the Targeted Agricultural Modernisation Schemes (TAMS), Registered Farm Partnerships/Collaborative Farming Grant Scheme, Stamp Duty Exemption on Transfers of Land to Young Trained Farmers, Capital Acquisitions Tax Relief, and Stock Relief on Income Tax for Certain Young Trained Farmers.

It is expected that future CAP reform will have benefits for young trained farmers. Completing training with Teagasc will allow you to benefit from future schemes and reliefs.

Why choose a Teagasc course?

Teagasc has a major input into higher education and postgraduate education delivery, through its extensive partnership with the higher education sector.

Teagasc also has substantial involvement in providing short courses and continuous professional development.

Teagasc is unrivalled in the depth of knowledge and expertise it can draw on to support your education.

Teagasc is at the cutting edge of research and knowledge transfer for the land and agri-food sectors.

Teagasc engages with all land sector areas including farming, agricultural mechanisation, horticulture, forestry and equine as well as financial institutions, agri-service providers, the food processing sector and state agencies.

In Teagasc full-time courses, teaching and learning is split about 50:50 between the classroom and outdoor practical instruction.

Full-time students spend time away from the college on a host farm or unit, in Level 5 and Level 6 programmes.

For Level 6 programmes, Teagasc encourages and facilitates students to complete their Practical Learning Period (PLP) overseas, but it is not a requirement.

The PLP programmes are delivered through a network of over 1,000 registered host farms and units.

Teagasc education programmes are delivered through its network of seven colleges (four Teagasc colleges and three linked private colleges) and Teagasc’s 12 advisory regions.

  What do Teagasc graduates say?

Teagasc conducts a ‘look back’ survey among its Level 6 graduates five years after they graduate. The aggregated findings from those responding show a:

  Very high level of graduates working in the industry post-graduation (90% plus).

  Substantial involvement at management level.

  Increased levels of activity and investment by graduates.

  A positive view of how their Teagasc education prepared them for their career.

  A very high level of endorsement of their Teagasc course to others.

Where can I get more information?

Visit the education pages on the www.teagasc.ie website for additional information.

(Source – Irish Examiner – Farming – Stephen Cadogan – 14/09/2019)

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The Rural Enterprise Skillnet is funded by member companies and the Training Networks Programme, an initiative of Skillnets Ltd. funded from the National Training Fund through the Department of Education and Skills.

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